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P372.  Pinned Like Rats in a Hole by Mark Churms. <p>Depicting Private Hook and Private Williams, B Company, 2nd Battalion, 24th Foot inside the burning hospital at Rorkes Drift, 7pm January 1879. At about 6 pm the Zulus first forced their way into the hospital building where some thirty patients were defended by a handful of able-bodied men. A running fight ensued as the patients were evacuated from room to room, a desperate struggle made all the more terrible when the Zulus set fire to the thatched roof. Here Private Alfred Henry Hook holds Zulus of the uThulwana regiment at bay whilst Private John Williams helps a patient escape; Hook received a head wound when a spear struck off his helmet.<b><p>Postcard<p> Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)
P373.  Pot That Fellow by Mark Churms <p>Acting Assistant Commissary J.L. Dalton commissariat and transport department and colour sergeant F. Bourne, during the battle at the front wall about 6pm at Rorkes Drift. Frank Bourne was born  on the 27th April 1854  in Balcombe Sussex, when Bourne was 18 he joined the 24th Regiment in 1872, being promoted to Corporal in 1875 and Sergeant in 1878.  Sergeant Bourne was promoted to Colour Sergeant soon after the rgeiment arrived in Natal.  Colour Sgt bourne was part of B company whose job was to guard the hospital at Rorkes Drift.  Colour Sgt Bourne played a major role in keeping the defending troops effective.  Colour Sgt Bourne was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his role in the defence, and it is surprising that he was not awarded a Victoria Cross as 11 were awarded for the defence. Col Sgt Bourne retired form the army in 1907, but  joined again for WW1, serving in Dublin.  He was the last survivor of Rorkes Drift, passing away at the age of 91 on the 8th May 1945 by coincidence being VE day.<b><p> Postcard<p>Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)
P371. Wounded by Mark Churms <p>Corporal Allen and Corporal Lyons, B. Company 2nd Battalion 24th Foot Rorkes Drift Back Wall, 6pm January 22nd 1879.  After the initial Zulu assault on the back wall of the post failed at about 4.30pm, a fire-fight broke out between Zulu snipers posted on the terraces of the Shiyane (Oskarsberg) Hill and the defenders posted behind the barricade of wagons and mealie-bags. This section of the wall as commanded by Sergeant Henry Gallagher, of B Company. At about 6 pm, Corporal Lyons was leaning over the barricade to aim when he was hit in the neck by a bullet which paralysed him; as his friend, Corporal Allen, bent to help him, Allen too was shot through the arm. In the foreground Corporal Attwood of the Army Service Corps distributes ammunition. The wall was abandoned shortly after and the British retired to the small are in front of the storehouse. Allen was later awarded the VC, and Attwood the DCM.  He was born at Churcham, Gloucestershire, and served for five years in the Monmouthshire Militia before joining the 24th Regiment. He served through the Kaffir War 1877-8 before his bravery at Rorkes Drift for which he was presented with the Victoria Cross by Lord Wolseley on August 3rd 1879. He later served in the 1st Volunteers Battalion Royal Fusiliers.<b><p>Postcard<p>Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)
P084. The Battle of Isandhlwana by Charles Fripp. <p>On the 11th January 1879, a British Force under the command of Lord Chelmsford crossed the Buffalo River into Zululand.  A small garrison was left at Rorkes Drift.  The force consisted of 1600 British troops, mainly from the 1st and 2nd Battalions 24th Regiment, and 2500 native soldiers.  A tented camp was established at Isandhlwana Hill.  At 4am on the morning of 22nd January, Lord Chelmsford took half his force to reconnoitre to southeast in search of main Zulu army.  Just after 8am a force of 25000 Zulu warriors attacked the remainder of the force in the camp.  Surprised, outnumbered by more than six to one, in a position offering little defence, the defenders were soon overpowered and a dreadful slaughter ensued.  A few men escaped and re-crossed the Buffalo River to safety.  Victoria Crosses were awarded to Lieutenants Melvill and Coghill, who saved the Queens Colour of the 1st/24th and to Private Wassell, 90th Foot, who saved a comrade while escaping across the Buffalo River.<b><p>Postcard<p> Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)
P971.  The Last Sleep of the Brave by Alphonse de Neuville.  <p>Scouts find the bodies of Melville and Coghill with the colours nearby.  In fact, the Colours were lost in the river and were found later, both men were posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.  Lieutenant Melville was the adjutant of the 1st Battalion, the 24th Foot.  Melville collected the Queen's Colours from the guard tent towards the end of the battle and rode out of camp heading for the Tugela River.  Melville arrived at the river, and due to the heavy rains the Tugela was in flood.  Melville rode into the river but about half way across came off his horse, still clutching the colours.  Lieutenant Coghill, also of the 24th Foot, crossed the river soon after and went to Melville's assistance.  The Zulus were on the bank and opened a heavy fire on them.  Lt Coghill's horse was killed and the colour swept away.  Both officers struggled to the Natal bank where it seems it is llikely that both men were killed by Natal natives.<b><p>Postcard<p> Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)
P970. Saving the Queens Colours by Alphonse de Neuville. <p>The painting shows Lieutenant T. Melville along with Lieutenant N J A Coghill attempting to Save the Queen's Colours of the 1/24th and fight their way out of the Battle of Isandhlwana.  Lieutenant Melville was the adjutant of the 1st Battalion, the 24th Foot.  Melville collected the Queen's Colours from the guard tent towards the end of the battle and rode out of camp heading for the Tugela River.  Melville arrived at the river, and due to the heavy rains the Tugela was in flood.  Melville rode into the river but about half way across came off his horse, still clutching the colours.  Lieutenant Coghill, also of the 24th Foot, crossed the river soon after and went to Melville's assistance.  The Zulus were on the bank and opened a heavy fire on them.  Lt Coghill's horse was killed and the colour swept away.  Both officers struggled to the Natal bank where it seems it is llikely that both men were killed by Natal natives.  The colours would later be recovered from the Tugela River.  Both officers would be later awarded the Victoria Cross.  The losses during the battle were 52 British officers and 806 non-commissioned ranks were killed and 471 Africans died fighting for the British.  Zulu warrior dead were around 2,000 dead either on the field or from wounds.  There were only around 60 Europeans survived the battle. <b><p>Postcard<p> Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)
P022. Defence of Rorkes Drift, 22nd January 1879 by Alphonse de Neuville. <p>By about 6pm the Zulu attacks had extended all around the front of the post, and fighting raged at hand-to-hand along the mealie-bag wall. Lieutenant Chard himself took up a position on the barricade, firing over the mealie-bags with a Martini-Henry, whilst Lieutenant Bromhead directed any spare men to plug the gaps in the line. The men in the yard and on the front wall were dangerously exposed to the fire of Zulu marksmen posted in the rocky terraces on Shiyane (Oskarsberg) hill behind the post. Several men were hit, including Acting Assistant Commissary Dalton, and Corporal Allen of the 14th. Surgeon Reynolds treated the wounded as best he could despite the fire. Once the veranda at the front of the hospital had been abandoned, the Zulus had mounted a determined attack on the building itself, setting fire to the thatched roof with spears tied with burning grass. The defenders were forced to evacuate the patients room by room, eventually passing them out through a small window into the open yard. Shortly after 6pm Chard decided that the Zulu pressure was too great, and ordered a withdrawal to a barricade of biscuit boxes which had been hastily erected across the yard, from the corner of the store-house to the front mealie-bag wall. In this small compound the garrison would fight for their lives throughout most of the coming night.<b><p>Postcard<p> Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)
P370.  Eve of Distinction by Mark Churms.  <p>Lt. John Rouse Merriot Chard, Royal Engineers.At about 3.30 on the afternoon of 22nd January 1879, Lieutenant John Rouse Merriot Chard, Royal Engineers, was supervising repairs on the military pont on the Mzinyathi river, at the border crossing at Rorkes Drift, when survivors brought news  that the advanced British camp at Isandhlwana had been over-run by the Zulus, and that a wing of the Zulu army was on its way to attack Rorkes Drift. Chard ordered Driver Robson to pack up the wagon and return to the mission station, where a stockpile of supplies was under the guard of B Company, 2/24th Regiment. Chard, in consultation with his fellow officers, made the historic decision to make a stand at Rorkes Drift.<b><p>Postcard<p> Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)

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Postcard Set 1 (Zulu War)

PS1. Postcard Set 1.

Set of 8 Zulu War Postcards, including : Pinned Like Rats in a Hole, Eve of Distinction, Wounded, Pot That Fellow, The Last Sleep of the Brave, Saving the Queens Colours, Defence of Rorkes Drift, 22nd January 1879, The Battle of Isandhlwana.

Each postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

P372. Pinned Like Rats in a Hole by Mark Churms.

Depicting Private Hook and Private Williams, B Company, 2nd Battalion, 24th Foot inside the burning hospital at Rorkes Drift, 7pm January 1879. At about 6 pm the Zulus first forced their way into the hospital building where some thirty patients were defended by a handful of able-bodied men. A running fight ensued as the patients were evacuated from room to room, a desperate struggle made all the more terrible when the Zulus set fire to the thatched roof. Here Private Alfred Henry Hook holds Zulus of the uThulwana regiment at bay whilst Private John Williams helps a patient escape; Hook received a head wound when a spear struck off his helmet.

Postcard

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

P373. Pot That Fellow by Mark Churms

Acting Assistant Commissary J.L. Dalton commissariat and transport department and colour sergeant F. Bourne, during the battle at the front wall about 6pm at Rorkes Drift. Frank Bourne was born on the 27th April 1854 in Balcombe Sussex, when Bourne was 18 he joined the 24th Regiment in 1872, being promoted to Corporal in 1875 and Sergeant in 1878. Sergeant Bourne was promoted to Colour Sergeant soon after the rgeiment arrived in Natal. Colour Sgt bourne was part of B company whose job was to guard the hospital at Rorkes Drift. Colour Sgt Bourne played a major role in keeping the defending troops effective. Colour Sgt Bourne was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his role in the defence, and it is surprising that he was not awarded a Victoria Cross as 11 were awarded for the defence. Col Sgt Bourne retired form the army in 1907, but joined again for WW1, serving in Dublin. He was the last survivor of Rorkes Drift, passing away at the age of 91 on the 8th May 1945 by coincidence being VE day.

Postcard

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Item #3 - Click to view individual item

P371. Wounded by Mark Churms

Corporal Allen and Corporal Lyons, B. Company 2nd Battalion 24th Foot Rorkes Drift Back Wall, 6pm January 22nd 1879. After the initial Zulu assault on the back wall of the post failed at about 4.30pm, a fire-fight broke out between Zulu snipers posted on the terraces of the Shiyane (Oskarsberg) Hill and the defenders posted behind the barricade of wagons and mealie-bags. This section of the wall as commanded by Sergeant Henry Gallagher, of B Company. At about 6 pm, Corporal Lyons was leaning over the barricade to aim when he was hit in the neck by a bullet which paralysed him; as his friend, Corporal Allen, bent to help him, Allen too was shot through the arm. In the foreground Corporal Attwood of the Army Service Corps distributes ammunition. The wall was abandoned shortly after and the British retired to the small are in front of the storehouse. Allen was later awarded the VC, and Attwood the DCM. He was born at Churcham, Gloucestershire, and served for five years in the Monmouthshire Militia before joining the 24th Regiment. He served through the Kaffir War 1877-8 before his bravery at Rorkes Drift for which he was presented with the Victoria Cross by Lord Wolseley on August 3rd 1879. He later served in the 1st Volunteers Battalion Royal Fusiliers.

Postcard

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Item #4 - Click to view individual item

P084. The Battle of Isandhlwana by Charles Fripp.

On the 11th January 1879, a British Force under the command of Lord Chelmsford crossed the Buffalo River into Zululand. A small garrison was left at Rorkes Drift. The force consisted of 1600 British troops, mainly from the 1st and 2nd Battalions 24th Regiment, and 2500 native soldiers. A tented camp was established at Isandhlwana Hill. At 4am on the morning of 22nd January, Lord Chelmsford took half his force to reconnoitre to southeast in search of main Zulu army. Just after 8am a force of 25000 Zulu warriors attacked the remainder of the force in the camp. Surprised, outnumbered by more than six to one, in a position offering little defence, the defenders were soon overpowered and a dreadful slaughter ensued. A few men escaped and re-crossed the Buffalo River to safety. Victoria Crosses were awarded to Lieutenants Melvill and Coghill, who saved the Queens Colour of the 1st/24th and to Private Wassell, 90th Foot, who saved a comrade while escaping across the Buffalo River.

Postcard

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Item #5 - Click to view individual item

P971. The Last Sleep of the Brave by Alphonse de Neuville.

Scouts find the bodies of Melville and Coghill with the colours nearby. In fact, the Colours were lost in the river and were found later, both men were posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross. Lieutenant Melville was the adjutant of the 1st Battalion, the 24th Foot. Melville collected the Queen's Colours from the guard tent towards the end of the battle and rode out of camp heading for the Tugela River. Melville arrived at the river, and due to the heavy rains the Tugela was in flood. Melville rode into the river but about half way across came off his horse, still clutching the colours. Lieutenant Coghill, also of the 24th Foot, crossed the river soon after and went to Melville's assistance. The Zulus were on the bank and opened a heavy fire on them. Lt Coghill's horse was killed and the colour swept away. Both officers struggled to the Natal bank where it seems it is llikely that both men were killed by Natal natives.

Postcard

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Item #6 - Click to view individual item

P970. Saving the Queens Colours by Alphonse de Neuville.

The painting shows Lieutenant T. Melville along with Lieutenant N J A Coghill attempting to Save the Queen's Colours of the 1/24th and fight their way out of the Battle of Isandhlwana. Lieutenant Melville was the adjutant of the 1st Battalion, the 24th Foot. Melville collected the Queen's Colours from the guard tent towards the end of the battle and rode out of camp heading for the Tugela River. Melville arrived at the river, and due to the heavy rains the Tugela was in flood. Melville rode into the river but about half way across came off his horse, still clutching the colours. Lieutenant Coghill, also of the 24th Foot, crossed the river soon after and went to Melville's assistance. The Zulus were on the bank and opened a heavy fire on them. Lt Coghill's horse was killed and the colour swept away. Both officers struggled to the Natal bank where it seems it is llikely that both men were killed by Natal natives. The colours would later be recovered from the Tugela River. Both officers would be later awarded the Victoria Cross. The losses during the battle were 52 British officers and 806 non-commissioned ranks were killed and 471 Africans died fighting for the British. Zulu warrior dead were around 2,000 dead either on the field or from wounds. There were only around 60 Europeans survived the battle.

Postcard

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Item #7 - Click to view individual item

P022. Defence of Rorkes Drift, 22nd January 1879 by Alphonse de Neuville.

By about 6pm the Zulu attacks had extended all around the front of the post, and fighting raged at hand-to-hand along the mealie-bag wall. Lieutenant Chard himself took up a position on the barricade, firing over the mealie-bags with a Martini-Henry, whilst Lieutenant Bromhead directed any spare men to plug the gaps in the line. The men in the yard and on the front wall were dangerously exposed to the fire of Zulu marksmen posted in the rocky terraces on Shiyane (Oskarsberg) hill behind the post. Several men were hit, including Acting Assistant Commissary Dalton, and Corporal Allen of the 14th. Surgeon Reynolds treated the wounded as best he could despite the fire. Once the veranda at the front of the hospital had been abandoned, the Zulus had mounted a determined attack on the building itself, setting fire to the thatched roof with spears tied with burning grass. The defenders were forced to evacuate the patients room by room, eventually passing them out through a small window into the open yard. Shortly after 6pm Chard decided that the Zulu pressure was too great, and ordered a withdrawal to a barricade of biscuit boxes which had been hastily erected across the yard, from the corner of the store-house to the front mealie-bag wall. In this small compound the garrison would fight for their lives throughout most of the coming night.

Postcard

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Item #8 - Click to view individual item

P370. Eve of Distinction by Mark Churms.

Lt. John Rouse Merriot Chard, Royal Engineers.At about 3.30 on the afternoon of 22nd January 1879, Lieutenant John Rouse Merriot Chard, Royal Engineers, was supervising repairs on the military pont on the Mzinyathi river, at the border crossing at Rorkes Drift, when survivors brought news that the advanced British camp at Isandhlwana had been over-run by the Zulus, and that a wing of the Zulu army was on its way to attack Rorkes Drift. Chard ordered Driver Robson to pack up the wagon and return to the mission station, where a stockpile of supplies was under the guard of B Company, 2/24th Regiment. Chard, in consultation with his fellow officers, made the historic decision to make a stand at Rorkes Drift.

Postcard

Postcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)


Website Price: £ 12.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost £16.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save £4




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

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